Posts Tagged 'University of California'

Children get more satisfaction from relationships with their pets than with siblings

Children get more satisfaction from relationships with their pets than with their brothers or sisters, according to new research from the University of Cambridge. Children also appear to get on even better with their animal companions than with siblings.

The research adds to increasing evidence that household pets may have a major influence on , and could have a positive impact on children’s social skills and emotional well-being.

Pets are almost as common as siblings in western households, ...

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Too Much Sitting, Too Little Exercise May Accelerate Biological Aging

LA JOLLA, Calif., Jan. 18 — The University of California’s San Diego campus issued the following news release:

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary.

The study, publishing online January 18 in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found elderly women with less than 40 minutes of ...

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Jeannie Kever – Researchers Report New Understanding of Global Warming

Researchers know that more, and more dangerous, storms have begun to occur as the climate warms. A team of scientists has reported an underlying explanation, using meteorological satellite data gathered over a 35-year period.

The examination of the movement and interaction of mechanical energies across the atmosphere, published Jan. 24 in the journal Nature Communications, is the first to explore long-term variations of the Lorenz energy cycle – a complex formula used to describe the interaction between potential and kinetic energy ...

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Roundup Now Proven To Cause Liver Disease, And It’s In Your Food

In addition to the other documented risks of Monsanto’s Roundup, a cutting-edge study using molecular profiling reveals that it also causes liver disease, even at doses currently approved by regulators.

Researchers at King’s College London have discovered that the popular weedkiller Roundup causes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The two-year study performed on rats tested the effect of real-world glyphosate doses currently permitted by regulators. This is the first time that science has shown a direct causal link between ...

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Climate change to shift global pattern of mild weather

As scientists work to predict how climate change may affect hurricanes, droughts, floods, blizzards and other severe weather, there’s one area that’s been overlooked: mild weather. But no more.

NOAA and Princeton University scientists have produced the first global analysis of how climate change may affect the frequency and location of mild weather – days that are perfect for an outdoor wedding, baseball, fishing, boating, hiking or a picnic. Scientists defined “mild” weather as temperatures between 64 and 86 degrees F, ...

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The power of maternal touch

Touch is habitual and can sometimes be involuntary for many people; a casual stroke to express affection, or a hug to offer comfort. However, a study by NUS Psychology researchers has revealed that touch is a significant factor in the social development of young children between four and six years.

Conducted by a team supervised by NUS Psychology Associate Professor Annett Schirmer, this is the first such study to focus on the relationship between touch and social development in children older ...

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Alexandra Jacobo – New study confirms findings of faster global warming, despite what the GOP claims

A new study has confirmed what the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration originally found in 2015 – the oceans are warming at nearly twice the rate we originally thought.

After publishing their findings in 2015, the NOAA was immediately attacked by members of the GOP. GOP members of the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, headed by Rep. Lamar Smith, opened an investigation into the conclusions. According to Smith, “NOAA has failed to fully explain the ...

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Live long and … Facebook?

Is social media good for you, or bad? Well, it’s complicated. A study of 12 million Facebook users suggests that using Facebook is associated with living longer — when it serves to maintain and enhance your real-world social ties.

Oh and you can relax and stop watching how many “likes” you get: That doesn’t seem to correlate at all.

The study — which the researchers emphasize is an association study and cannot identify causation — was led by University ...

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The current state of psychobiotics

Now that we know that gut bacteria can speak to the brain—in ways that affect our mood, our appetite, and even our circadian rhythms—the next challenge for scientists is to control this communication. The science of psychobiotics, reviewed October 25 in Trends in Neurosciences, explores emerging strategies for planting brain-altering bacteria in the gut to provide mental benefits and the challenges ahead in understanding how such products could work for humans.

Psychobiotics is a recent term. While it’s ...

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Are Organic Farms Really Worse When It Comes to Greenhouse Gases?

Organic farming earned some negative press recently with the publication of a paper that linked it to higher greenhouse emissions, but the truth is a little more complex.

The paper, by University of Oregon Ph.D. student Julius McGee and published in the journal Agriculture and Human Values, found what appears to be a shocking bit of information: “Organic farming,” McGee says, “is correlated positively and not negatively with greenhouse gas emissions.”

The study used data from 49 states collected between 2000 and ...

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