Posts Tagged 'Research'

Globe-trotting pollutants raise some cancer risks 4 times higher than predicted

CORVALLIS, Ore. — A new way of looking at how pollutants ride through the atmosphere has quadrupled the estimate of global lung cancer risk from a pollutant caused by combustion, to a level that is now double the allowable limit recommended by the World Health Organization.

The findings, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition online, showed that tiny floating particles can grow semi-solid around pollutants, allowing them to last longer and travel much ...

Continue Reading →
0

Sarah DeWeerdt – Cities Are Driving Rapid Evolutionary Changes to Plant and Animal Species

Cities are driving rapid evolutionary changes to plant and animal species, according to a study published yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Usually, we think of evolution as happening in remote, isolated, or pristine places—the Galapagos Islands, for example. But the new findings suggest that scientists can’t understand evolution as it’s currently occurring without grappling with the complex and expanding urban landscape.

An international team of researchers searched the scientific literature for data on changes in the ...

Continue Reading →
0

Susan Kelley – For kids, poverty means psychological deficits as adults

A large and growing body of research shows that poor kids grow up to have a host of physical problems as adults

Now add psychological deficits to the list, Cornell researchers say.

Childhood poverty can cause significant psychological deficits in adulthood, according to a sweeping new study. The research, conducted by tracking participants over a 15-year period, is the first to show this damage occurs over time and in a broad range of ways.

Impoverished children in the study had more psychological distress ...

Continue Reading →
0

Rare look at youth post detention is bleak

A new Northwestern Medicine study offers a bleak assessment in a rare look at the outcomes of delinquent youth five and 12 years after juvenile detention.

Central to poor outcomes for the youth post detention are stark and persistent racial, ethnic and gender disparities, according to the massive study that began in the mid-1990s.

African-American males fared the worst, with lives characterized by incarceration, criminal activity and few positive outcomes. Hispanic males functioned more poorly overall than non-Hispanic white ...

Continue Reading →
0

Many GMO studies have financial conflicts of interest

Financial conflicts of interest were found in 40 percent of published research articles on the genetically modified crops, also known as GMO crops, French researchers said this week.

The findings in the December 15 edition of the US journal PLOS ONE focused on hundreds of published in international scientific journals.

“We found that ties between researchers and the GM crop industry were common, with 40 percent of the articles considered displaying conflicts of interest,” said the ...

Continue Reading →
0

Why the hype around medical genetics is a public enemy

Science has always issued medical promissory notes. In the 17th century, Francis Bacon promised that an understanding of the true mechanisms of disease would enable us to extend life almost indefinitely; René Descartes thought that 1,000 years sounded reasonable. But no science has been more optimistic, more based on promises, than medical genetics.

Recently, I read an article promising that medical genetics will soon deliver ‘a world in which doctors come to their patients and tell them what diseases ...

Continue Reading →
0

Avoiding spiritual struggles and existential questions is linked with poorer mental health

Fear of confronting the tensions and conflicts brought on by existential concerns—the “big questions” of life—is linked with poorer mental health, including higher levels of depression, anxiety and difficulty regulating emotions, according to a new Case Western Reserve University study.

“Religious and spiritual struggles—conflicts with God or religious , tough questions about faith, morality, and the meaning of life—these are often taboo topics, and the temptation to push them away is strong,” said Julie Exline, professor of psychological ...

Continue Reading →
0

VACCINATION: AN ANALYSIS OF THE HEALTH RISKS BY: GARY NULL, PH.D., AND MARTIN FELDMAN, M.D.

Vaccination: An Analysis of the Health Risks
by Gary Null, Ph.D., and Martin Feldman, M.D.
For more than a hundred years, two basic assumptions have been put forth by public health officials. One is that vaccines are safe. The second is that vaccines are effective for the conditions for which they’re given. The public and our legislators have, by and large, accepted these assumptions as true, ...
Continue Reading →
0

Athletic performance linked to mortality

In two studies, the results of which will be published in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, basketball-playing participants scored more points after being presented with death-related prompts, either direct questions about their own mortality or a more subtle, visual reminder of death.

Researchers say the improved performance is the result of a subconscious effort to boost self-esteem, which is a protective buffer against fear of death, according to psychology’s terror management theory.

“Terror management theory talks ...

Continue Reading →
0

Caloric restriction can be beneficial to the brain, study shows

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at VerticalNews Health — Studies of different animal species suggest a link between eating less and living longer, but the molecular mechanisms by which caloric restriction affords protection against disease and extends longevity are not well understood.

New clues to help solve the mystery are presented in an article published in the September issue of Aging Cell by scientists at the Center for Research on Redox Processes in Biomedicine (Redoxoma), one of the Research, Innovation ...

Continue Reading →
0
Page 1 of 5 12345