Posts Tagged 'Asia'

Victoria Pope – Much of the Cuisine We Now Know, and Think of as Ours, Came to Us by War

The relish on my plate is Sicilian, a tangy blend of sweet and sour flavors. I can pick out some of the ingredients—eggplant, capers, celery—right away. I haven’t a clue, however, about the forces that came together to create this exquisite vegetable dish.

Gaetano Basile, a writer and lecturer on the food and culture of Sicily, does know. He has invited me to Lo Scudiero, a family-run restaurant in Palermo, as a tasty introduction to the island’s food and its history. ...

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Globe-trotting pollutants raise some cancer risks 4 times higher than predicted

CORVALLIS, Ore. — A new way of looking at how pollutants ride through the atmosphere has quadrupled the estimate of global lung cancer risk from a pollutant caused by combustion, to a level that is now double the allowable limit recommended by the World Health Organization.

The findings, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition online, showed that tiny floating particles can grow semi-solid around pollutants, allowing them to last longer and travel much ...

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Dr Claudio Schuftan – Human Rights and Health Inequality. A Worldwide Phenomenon

THE MOST COMMON DESCRIPTION OF HEALTH INEQUALITY TRENDS AMONG AND WITHIN COUNTRIES IS THAT HEALTH INEQUALITIES ARE INCREASING: A CLEAR INFRINGEMENT OF THE HUMAN RIGHT TO HEALTH.

This text is mostly abstracted from chapter 18 of the International Panel on Social Progress, 2016

-Inequality in health is a morally significant fact in itself.

A purely biomedical understanding of diminished health and preventable mortality misses key dimensions of social and economic issues.

1. The differences in health statistics that impinge ...

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Sharna Oldman, Ph.D. – The Science and Pseudoscience of Children’s Mental Health

Over the past two decades, there has been a meteoric rise in the number of children – now estimated to be 1 in 6 – diagnosed and treated for a range of psychological disturbances including ADHD, autism, mood disorders, and learning disabilities. Explanations in the popular media tend to polarize around two viewpoints:

1)    Childhood mental illnesses are caused by genetically ...

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Fabiana Frayssinet – Agroecology Booming in Argentina

BUENOS AIRES, Dec 23 2016 (IPS) – Organic agriculture is rapidly expanding in Argentina, the leading agroecological producer in Latin America and second in the world after Australia, as part of a backlash against a model that has disappointed producers and is starting to worry consumers.

According to the intergovernmental Inter American Commission on Organic Agriculture (ICOA), in the Americas there are 9.9 million hectares of certified organic crops, which is 22 per cent of the total ...

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César Chelala – Poverty: The Dark Side of the American Empire

If we have learned anything from this last presidential election it’s that poverty continues to be an ignored concept by president-elect Trump and by U. S. politicians. Although both avoid using the word like a naked man avoids a poisonous snake, poverty is integral to the current reality of the U.S. socio- political landscape. The selection by president- elect Trump of the richest cabinet in the country’s history doesn’t bode well for the poor in America.
Poverty is a state of ...
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Sarah Boseley – Baby boomers ‘should work for longer to stay healthy’

The baby boomer generation, now in their 50s to 70s, should stop thinking about putting their feet up when they retire – and maybe not retire at all for the sake of their health, according to the government’s chief medical officer.

Professor Sally Davies, in her latest annual report on the health of the nation, to be published on Tuesday, is expected to say that people of retirement age might do well to stay in work if they can, or else ...

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The Toxic Science of Flu Vaccines – Gary Null

The Toxic Science of Flu Vaccines

 

Richard Gale and Gary Null

Progressive Radio Network, October 31, 2016

 

 

Joshua Hadfield was a normal, healthy developing child as a toddler. In the midst of the 2010 H1N1 swine flu frenzy and fear mongering about the horrible consequences children face if left unvaccinated, the Hadfield’s had Joshua vaccinated with Glaxo’s Pandermrix influenza vaccine.  Within weeks, Joshua could barely wake up, sleeping up to nineteen hours a day.  Laughter would trigger seizures.

 

Joshua was diagnosed with narcolepsy, “an ...

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Alejandro Aravena – Two billion more people will live in cities by 2035. This could be good – or very bad

This week in Quito as many as 45,000 people have gathered for Habitat III, the global UN summit which, every 20 years, resets the world’s urban agenda.

Why should we care? Well, to start with, in the next 20 years, we will witness more than two billion more people moving to cities. Depending on what we do to accommodate them, this could be good – or very bad – news.

It’s good news because people are demonstrably better off in cities than ...

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Nigel Warburton – Why every child in need deserves an urgent response

What would you do if you saw a six-year-old alone in a public place?’ So begins a short video from UNICEF, which has received more than 2 million views on YouTube. In the video, Anano, a six-year-old child actor, is dressed in different ways and placed in different scenarios. When Anano is well-dressed, we see people actively trying to help her. But when Anano’s appearance is altered to make her look homeless, we see people shunning her and ...

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