Posts Tagged 'Archaeological site'

Globe-trotting pollutants raise some cancer risks 4 times higher than predicted

CORVALLIS, Ore. — A new way of looking at how pollutants ride through the atmosphere has quadrupled the estimate of global lung cancer risk from a pollutant caused by combustion, to a level that is now double the allowable limit recommended by the World Health Organization.

The findings, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition online, showed that tiny floating particles can grow semi-solid around pollutants, allowing them to last longer and travel much ...

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ANNALEE NEWITZ – How cooking vegetables changed humanity 10,000 years ago

When you imagine Neolithic hunter-gatherers, you probably think of people eating hunks of meat around an open fire. But the truth is that many humans living 10,000 years ago were eating more vegetables and grains than meat. Researchers discovered this after an extensive chemical analysis of 110 pottery fragments found in the Libyan Sahara Desert, a region that was once a humid savannah full of lakes, herd animals, and lush plant life.

The pottery was excavated at two archaeological sites: Uan ...

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Connect The Dots – From AIM and Spectra to Dakota Access- Connecting the Pipelines – 10.05.16

Listen to Rachel Marco-Havens a solutionary artist, performer, creative entrepreneur and community organizer who works with Earth Injustice about the mounting nationwide resistance to dirty fuel pipelines e in conversation with Alison Rose Levy.

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Tim Radford – Forests of southwest US face mass die-off by 2100

Tens of millions of trees in California are now at risk because of sustained drought, according to new research. And a different study in a different journal foresees a parched future for the evergreen forests not just in the Golden State but in the entire US southwest.

Gregory Asner of the Carnegie Institution for Science in Stanford, California and colleagues used airborne, laser-guided imaging instruments to measure, for the first time, the full impact of California’s four-year drought, and combined their ...

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