Posts Tagged 'Andes'

Anna Sophie Gross – Amazon deforestation rises as government moves to weaken Indigenous protections

The Brazilian government is changing the process for approving indigenous lands, with critics warning the country now risks sliding back after years of progress on climate and environment.

The move to strip the country’s National Indigenous Foundation (Funai) of its power on Indigenous land matters comes after the country saw a 30% rise in deforestation of tropical rainforests.

Brazil’s justice minister, Alexandre de Morates announced last week that decisions over demarcating Indigenous land will now be made by the ministry of ...

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Alejandro Aravena – Two billion more people will live in cities by 2035. This could be good – or very bad

This week in Quito as many as 45,000 people have gathered for Habitat III, the global UN summit which, every 20 years, resets the world’s urban agenda.

Why should we care? Well, to start with, in the next 20 years, we will witness more than two billion more people moving to cities. Depending on what we do to accommodate them, this could be good – or very bad – news.

It’s good news because people are demonstrably better off in cities than ...

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Cole Mellino – Bolivia’s Second-Largest Lake Dries Up: Is Utah’s Great Salt Lake Next?

Researchers from Utah State University found that the Beehive State’s Great Salt Lake has shrunk by 48 percent since 1847. Meanwhile, Lake Poopó, Bolivia’s second-largest lake, is died up and may be beyond recovery.

 

The Utah State researchers published their findings last month in a white paper, Impacts of Water Development on Great Salt Lake and the Wasatch Front. They warned that the Great Salt Lake may follow in the footsteps of some of the world’s salt lakes, such as the Aral ...

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Rise and fall of city states tied to stormy weather

Changeable weather may have been a major force in the success and failure of agrarian states in Mexico and Peru, according to climate and archaeological records.

For a new study, researchers looked at climate records for central Mexico gleaned from a stalagmite collected from Juxtlahuaca Cave in the state of Guerrero. They also looked at the climate record preserved in the Quelccaya ice cape in the Cordillera Vilcanota portion of the Peruvian Andes.

In both cases the climate records are based on ...

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Reynard Loki – Honeybees Are Facing a Global Threat, and If They Go, So Do We

“There is one masterpiece, the hexagonal cell, that touches perfection. No living creature, not even man, has achieved, in the centre of his sphere, what the bee has achieved in her own: and were some one from another world to descend and ask of the earth the most perfect creation of the logic of life, we should needs have to offer the humble comb of honey.”— Maurice Maeterlinck, The Life of the Bee [3], 1924

What is the most important animal ...

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Pope Francis: Unbridled Capitalism Is ‘Dung of the Devil’ – Jon Queally

In a far-reaching speech in Bolivia on Thursday, Pope Francis offered his apologies to, and begged forgiveness from, the native people of the Americas as he acknowledged the brutal treatment they received throughout the so-called “conquest of America.”

In a speech that also touched on the need to rapidly move away from the destructive model of Continue Reading →

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America is the worst polluter in the history of the world. We should let climate change refugees resettle here. By Michael B. Gerrard

Michael B. Gerrard, associate faculty chair at Columbia University’s Earth Institute, is the Andrew Sabin professor of professional practice and director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia Law School.

Toward the end of this century, if current trends are not reversed, large parts of Bangladesh, the Philippines, Indonesia, Pakistan, Egypt and Vietnam, among other countries, will be ...

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Changing climate causes weather chaos in Chile

The Atacama desert region of northern Chile, one of the driest areas on Earth, has been hit in recent days by torrential rains and floods that have caused deaths, swept away homes and left much of the region without power.

Meanwhile, in the usually lush southern parts of the country, wildfires are raging across lands and forests parched by the longest period of drought in living memory, endangering some of the world’s richest flora and fauna.

“We are witnessing a massive environmental ...

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