Health

Human leprosy found in British red squirrels

Scientists have discovered human leprosy in British red squirrels, uncovering one leprosy-driving bacterial strain, in particular, that is similar to that responsible for outbreaks of the disease in medieval Europe. The researchers say their findings suggest squirrels have been a reservoir for these ancient bacteria for decades, though they stress that the chances of people catching the disease from the animals are low. Leprosy, now largely confined to developing nations, has been thought to be exclusively transmitted in humans, mainly ...

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Illuminating lies with brain scan outshines polygraph test

It has been demonstrated that when someone is lying, areas of the brain linked to decision-making are activated, which lights up on an fMRI scan for experts to see. While laboratory studies showed fMRI’s ability to detect deception with up to 90 percent accuracy, estimates of polygraphs’ accuracy ranged wildly, between chance and 100 percent, depending on the study. The Penn study was the first to compare the two modalities in the same individuals in a blinded and prospective fashion. ...

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Sunshine matters a lot to mental health; temperature, pollution, rain not so much

Your day might be filled with irritatingly hot temperatures, thick air pollution and maybe even pockets of rainclouds, but that won’t necessarily get you down. If you’re able to soak up enough sun, your level of emotional distress should remain stable. Take away sun time, though, and your distress can spike. This applies to the clinical population at large, not just those diagnosed with Seasonal Affective Disorder.

“That’s one of the surprising pieces of our research,” said Mark Beecher, clinical professor ...

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Ian Johnston – People with early signs of Alzheimer’s more than seven times more likely to be lonely

Loneliness could be a factor in Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research.

Researchers used brain-imaging techniques to determine levels of amyloid – a protein associated with the disease – in the brains of a group of 79 apparently healthy people with an average age of 76.

They then compared this to a test designed to find out how lonely someone is.

After controlling for factors such as age, sex, genetics, depression, anxiety, socio-economic status and the participants’ social networks, they concluded that people ...

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Abused children more likely to be seriously ill as adults, says report

Children who suffer abuse, violence or other trauma at home are more likely to become seriously ill as adults, a report has concluded.

The study says children who endure four or more adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with a chronic disease in later life compared with those who have experienced none.

They are four times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, three times ...

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The Toxic Science of Flu Vaccines – Gary Null

The Toxic Science of Flu Vaccines

 

Richard Gale and Gary Null

Progressive Radio Network, October 31, 2016

 

 

Joshua Hadfield was a normal, healthy developing child as a toddler. In the midst of the 2010 H1N1 swine flu frenzy and fear mongering about the horrible consequences children face if left unvaccinated, the Hadfield’s had Joshua vaccinated with Glaxo’s Pandermrix influenza vaccine.  Within weeks, Joshua could barely wake up, sleeping up to nineteen hours a day.  Laughter would trigger seizures.

 

Joshua was diagnosed with narcolepsy, “an ...

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Here’s when powerful people have trouble making a decision

Although powerful people often tend to decide and act quickly, they become more indecisive than others when the decisions are toughest to make, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that when people who feel powerful also feel ambivalent about a – torn between two equally good or bad choices – they actually have a harder time taking action than people who feel less powerful.

That’s different than when are confronted ...

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The current state of psychobiotics

Now that we know that gut bacteria can speak to the brain—in ways that affect our mood, our appetite, and even our circadian rhythms—the next challenge for scientists is to control this communication. The science of psychobiotics, reviewed October 25 in Trends in Neurosciences, explores emerging strategies for planting brain-altering bacteria in the gut to provide mental benefits and the challenges ahead in understanding how such products could work for humans.

Psychobiotics is a recent term. While it’s ...

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Tim Radford – Population boom adds to city threats

LONDON, 28 October, 2016 – The world’s cities are growing even faster than the human population. Within the last 40 years, the global population has increased by a factor of 1.8,  but built-up areas have multiplied 2.5 times.

All of this information, and much more, appears in a new European Commission (EC) publication called the Atlas of the Human Planet, prepared to coincide with the recent third UN Habitat conference in Quito, Ecuador.

The Atlas shows that, 40 years ...

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Vetiver Oil: The Soothing Grass Oil

Vetiver oil, also known as khus oil, is a lesser-known plant oil that offers a heavy, earthy fragrance, which is reminiscent of patchouli but with a touch of lemon. It is believed to be very grounding, calming and stabilizing, and provides a range of essential oil uses and benefits. Learn more about this herbal oil.

What Is Vetiver Oil?

Chrysopogon zizanioides, commonly known as vetiver, is a perennial grass that belongs to the Poaceae family, which is native to India.1 ...

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