Higher Education

Aviva Chomsky – The Battle for the Soul of American Higher Education

During the past academic year, an upsurge of student activism, a movement of millennials, has swept campuses across the country and attracted the attention of the media. From coast to coast, from the Ivy League to state universities to small liberal arts colleges, a wave of student activism has focused on stopping climate change, promoting a living wage, fighting mass incarceration practices, supporting immigrant rights, and of course campaigning for Bernie Sanders.

Both the media and the schools that have been ...

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Study links student loans with lower net worth, housing values after college

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Student loan debt may negatively impact young people’s ability to accumulate wealth after they graduate or drop out of college, a new study suggests.

People who had outstanding balances on their student loans when they graduated or dropped out of college had lower net worth, fewer financial and nonfinancial assets, and homes with lower market values when they reached age 30, according to a paper accepted for publication in the journalChildren and Youth Services Review.

“After controlling for various ...

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Laurie Levy – The Cruel and Pointless Push to Get Preschoolers ‘College and Career Ready’

In case you missed it, April 21 was officially Kindergarten Day. This obscure holiday honors the birth of Friedrich Frobel, who started the first Children’s Garden in Germany in 1837. Of course, life has changed tremendously in the 179 years since Frobel created his play-based, socialization program to transition young children from home to school — and so, too, has school itself. But what hasn’t changed in all this time, not one iota, is the developmental trajectory of the ...

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Rachel M. Cohen – School Closures: A Blunt Instrument

n 2013, citing a $1.4 billion deficit, Philadelphia’s state-run school commission voted to close 23 schools—nearly 10 percent of the city’s stock. The decision came after a three-hour meeting at district headquarters, where 500 community members protested outside and 19 were arrested for trying to block district officials from casting their votes. Amid the fiscal pressure from state budget cuts, declining student enrollment, charter-school growth, and federal incentives to shut down low-performing schools, the district assured the public that closures ...

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Reporting of clinical trial results by top academic centers remains poor

Dissemination of clinical trial results by leading academic medical centres in the United States remains poor, despite ethical obligations – and sometimes statutory requirements – to publish findings and report results in a timely manner, concludes a study in The BMJ this week.

Researchers found that only 29% of completed  led by investigators at major US academic centers were published within two years of completion and only 13% reported results on the largest clinical trial registry, ...

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Kevin Kumashiro – Why Every Student Will NOT Succeed With the New Education Law

Last week, after a seven-year delay, Congress overwhelmingly voted, and the president signed, to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, dubbed No Child Left Behind in 2002, and now called the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).  This new law fixes some problems but creates others, especially for children who struggle the most.

The new law ends the NCLB requirement that states look almost exclusively at test scores to determine whether and how to reward or sanction schools, and also ends ...

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Melissa Dykes – Why Are College Students Willing to Barely Make More Money Than People Did in 1979?

A recent Pew Research report shows that the American middle class is disappearing. Most Americans are no longer considered middle class anymore. The wealth gap in this country, a gap that continues to grow, has already broken all records. In short, the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer.

Data also shows that, despite the fact that many American college students enter their adult lives by taking on tens (and sometimes hundreds) of thousands of dollars ...

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CORY DOCTOROW – Don’t work with assholes, says new research from Harvard Business School

In Toxic Workers , a new Harvard Business School working paper, Michael Housman and Dylan Minor look at the paradox of “superstar” workers who outperform their colleagues by 2:1 or more, but who are “toxic” — awful to work with and be around.

The connection between toxicity and productivity has been validated in several studies, but the question that Housman and Minor set out to answer is, “are 1%, superstar workers worth the trouble they cause in the workplace?”

Using a clever ...

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Study: Preschoolers need more outdoor time at child care centers

A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds child care centers play a pivotal role when it comes to the physical activity levels of preschoolers. Yet few children get to experience outdoor recess time as it is scheduled. Only 3 in 10 children had at least 60 minutes of a full child-care day outdoors for recess, as is recommended by guidelines.

The amount of outdoor time while at child care was the only factor that predicted the total amount ...

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Corey Robin – Aggrieved students find books dangerous; neoliberal administrators say they’re useless. I’d take the former any day

No one knows the power of literature better than the censor. That’s why he burns books: to fight fire with fire, to stop them from setting the world aflame. Or becomes an editor: Stalin, we now know, excised words from texts with about as much energy and attention as he excised men and women from the world. As Bertolt Brecht Continue Reading →

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